Friday, August 26, 2016

My LG G3 from Sprint is now 2 Androids versions behind








I thought I had Sprint's commitment that Marshmallow was coming for the LG G3 back in April.

Alas. With the release of Nougat, my phone is now 2 versions behind.

I've tweeted them again. Let's see if I get real information this time.

I would be content with a statement that they do not plan on updating the LG G3 again, instead of being strung along.

At best, would be a firm date we should have it by.

At worst, would be a statement again that no date is announced, and to watch their press room for an announcement.  That should be shining users on.



Monday, August 22, 2016

Using Google Keep - Two Recent Articles

Here are two recent posts from across the web on using Google Keep I had already linked to on the Google Keep Community on Google+.

How to Use Google Keep & Inbox to Create The Ultimate Task List from Business to Community.


and

Google Keep: Ultimate Guide from AndroidCentral.com


Moving your Evernote records to OneNote - one person's adventure

  



Lisa Schmeiser, writing at WinSuperSite.com, talks about lessons learned moving your almost 15,000 Evernote notes to OneNote on her Mac.

It was an experiment only. While there are things she likes about OneNote, she's sticking with Evernote.

WinSuperSite.com



Saturday, August 20, 2016

A Complete Guide to Google Keep

From Android Central:  A Complete Guide to Google Keep

Family Tech: Apple’s, Google’s and Amazon’s family plans offer lots of sharing options

Twenty years ago you bought a movie and put the VHS tape on the shelf near your VCR. If the movie wasn’t quite appropriate for the kids, it went into a shoebox on the top shelf of the parent’s closet. That’s where the kids found it when they got a bit older and snooped when the parents were out. 

Then along came online media purchases and things got more complex. Mom and Dad likely had separate iTunes or Android accounts. Often the kids did too. 

Movies purchased on one account had to be watched on a device tied to that account. If two kids wanted to watch Frozen on their own devices, some parents bought a copy for each child’s device. 

Apple, Google, and Amazon have made it a bit easier with shared family plans for the videos and other streaming and downloadable content. 

These programs allow family members to share purchases and consume them on various devices, even if the purchase was made on another account, as long as that account is part of the family plan. 

Apple’s plan has one adult agreeing to pay on their credit card for the purchases of up to five family members. At first, that sounds dangerous, but the kids’ purchases can require the adult’s approval before the transaction is made. This works for both paid and free downloads. The approval is done right on the adult’s device, so the child can make the request while at daycare, and the parent can approve while still at work, for example. 

All downloads of movies, apps, books and music appear on the list of all family members. And the adults can hide some of their purchases if they want, to keep the six year old from watching “The Shining.” 

Read the rest at www.FamilyTechOnline.com

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Microsoft's Evernote to OneNote conversion tool now on Mac






Its not a move I'd make, but some are casting about for alternatives to Evernote. Those already paying for Microsoft Office have Evernote as part of Office.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Note taking apps for Students

Long time readers know I find Evernote one of my most useful tools, and I advocate students use it.

Lifehacker.com recently posted a wonderful comparison of a number of note taking tools for students that is worth reading.

There is some exciting new developments in this space with Zoho's Notebook and Dropbox's Paper, neither of which are mentioned in the Lifehacker post.

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Family Tech: School Software and Making Plans for the Disaster to Come - August 12, 2016

Have you planned on things going wrong in your tech life?  They will.  Better to plan on it now and be ready.

And if you are sending a student away to school with a laptop, plan now on it breaking or getting stolen or some other catastrophe.

In July we talked about backup options.  Have you started using one yet? Have you setup your student with an automatic, offsite backup system so they do not have to think about it?

You will need it. That is almost a certainty.

What about anti-virus, for the the PCs at home and those going to college?  Get them installed now, and if there is a subscription, make sure it is paid through the end of the school year.

For the college students, check the school’s bookstore or website. Often schools have requirements for anti-virus software for all PCs that use their networks, and site licenses to provide it to students for free.

Before you buy any software for students, check with the university. Besides site licenses that provide free software to students, they also have academic discounts for other software often at vast savings.  

For $20 a month students can get a full range of Adobe software products or a year (and then just $30 a month). The package includes Acrobat, Premiere, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, Audition and many more.  These are professional grade software packages. Premiere was used to edit the movies Deadpool and Gone Girl for example.

They likely have discounts on Microsoft Office subscriptions and also for specialized software certain majors might need. Architectural, engineering, mathematics, physics, and other fields need specific and powerful software that would be costly if it were not for student discounts.

Some of these discounts are available to teachers and staff of colleges, universities and school districts as well.



Saturday, August 6, 2016

Google Voice can scare away the scammers an

A telemarketer called me on my cell phone the other day, and I chortled with delight. 

Normally, even if you hang up on one immediately as I did, you know they are only going to call back repeatedly.

Not this one--or any of them. I use Google Voice, so I was able to go into my call history and block future calls from that number. From then on when they call, they get the annoying disconnected sound and so they think my phone number is no longer valid. And their call never rings my phone again.

If I felt really mean, I could make them their own message talking about the nature of their marketing and perhaps questioning the caller’s life choices. I did not, but the thought that I could is enough to make me chortle on receiving a spam call.

Google Voice is not a well-known Google service, but it is one of the most useful. You only need a free Google account. If you already have a Gmail account, you are set. 

When you sign up for the actual Voice product, you are given a phone number. That number might be a local one or if no local ones are available, then from elsewhere in the country. That is not an issue since almost all cell phone and landline plans have free long distance.

At the Google Voice website you can choose what to do when your number is called. At its simplest, your call can be sent to your cell phone. 

You can have Voice ask callers to say their name. Then your phone will ring and you will hear who is calling and have the option of taking the call or sending it to voicemail. You can have all callers prompted, or just those whose numbers are not in your contact list.

A call can ring your cell phone, landline, your direct office line or all of them at once.

Read the rest at www.FamilyTechOnline.com